Eat your way through Germany

Germany attracts visitors for its beautiful countryside of mountains, forests, rivers and even beaches. While the landscape of Germany is vast and offers many opportunities to explore, a top of the list for visitors is immersing into the culture and traditions of the region you are visiting. The most recognizable opportunity for immersion is with the local cuisine. Germany is most known for its traditional German fare of bratwurst, pretzels and sauerkraut, but what is not known is that like other countries, the foods within Germany are regional. 

Made up of various food provisions that are reflective of the history of the region, cooking practices may also be influenced from neighboring countries. For instance, making a dish like bratwurst in Bavaria may be very different from those served in the Rhineland. Think, Chicago vs New York pizza. At the end of the day it’s pizza, but the thick vs thin crust is a debatable topic. One bratwurst may not be better than the other, they are just unique to their regions. 

Many restaurants throughout Germany have been awarded the highest Michelin dining designation (three stars) for dining excellence and have the fourth highest rating for total Michelin stars in the world after Japan, France and Italy. 

Journey into the dining experiences of the most popular regions of Germany, traveling from the southern Baden region to Bavaria, Franconia and the Rhineland. 

Baden

The Gemeinde Baden (that’s German for; Baden municipality) is in the southwestern portion of Germany north of Lake Constance at the Switzerland border and to the east of France. With a warmer climate than the rest of Germany, you will find many locally grown products that are incorporated within the cuisine. The combination of farm to table ingredients and influence from both France and Switzerland’s cuisine arguably make it some of the best food in Germany. 

With the country influences that surround Baden, there are actually only a few dishes here that are uniquely from Baden. Most of the offerings are popular dishes in neighboring regions that have been adjusted toward a uniquely Baden experience. These dishes will be adjusted using many of the fresh components that are readily available in Baden and the results are less heavy dishes than those found in other regions of Germany. 

For example, by adding additional eggs, the popular German noodle dish Spätzle tastes  richer than in other parts of Germany. In Baden, it is not uncommon to find traditional dishes from the nearby French Alsace region. Baeckeoffe, an Alsatian casserole dish and Flammekueche, a popular French Tart are served throughout the Baden region. The very popular German cabbage side dish, Sauerkrautor (sauerkraut), pretzels and German potato salad can also all be enjoyed with a unique Baden influence. 

Bavaria

East of Baden, in southeastern Germany, is the very popular Bavarian region. Bavaria, the largest state in Germany, is an elevated region and is credited for Germany’s  popular potato and beet dishes. Many of Germany’s signature dishes that are also found throughout the world were influenced by Bavaria’s eastern neighbors of Austria and the Czech Republic. 

Bavaria’s specialty dishes  include Brotzeit, a traditional bread snack, similar to the deli sandwich topped with meats, cheeses and condiments. Other notable dishes are Weisswurst (white sausage), Münchner Schnitzel (fried breaded cutlets) served with spätzel noodle dumplings, Knödel (boiled dumplings) and the world famous Bavarian pretzels, Brezel’s. 

The capital of Bavaria, Munich is Germany’s third largest city and the home of the popular annual festival, Oktoberfest, the world’s largest beer festival that occurs from mid to late September to early October. Regardless if you are visiting during the festival or any other time of year, you will want to pair your dining experience with a stein (mug) of local bier (beer). For full immersion into the gastronomic culture of Munich, take a Bavarian Beerand Food tour and visit some of the best beer halls in Germany.

Franconia

While technically a part of Bavaria, Franconia has its own unique cuisine. Franconia’s largest cities; Nuremberg, Bamberg & Würzburg carry a distinct culture that stems from the Medieval Germanic tribes that once existed here. 

Bread, potatoes and meats, like the rest of Bavaria, are still the main components of a Franconian meal, the biggest difference is the gravy that smothers the food creating a heartier dish. Franconian gravies can be enjoyed with various meats served in the area like Schäuferla, roast pork. 

There are many items to enjoy throughout Nuremberg and the other Franconian influenced locations within Bavaria. Grilled Nuremberger Bratwurst pork sausages served with sauerkraut, Franconian Bread soup and Zwiebelkuchen onion cake are all popular items. Not to be missed and the most well known dessert within Franconian culture is Nürnberger Lebkuchen, a gingerbread cake commonly found during the cooler holiday periods. 

Franconia is home to  hundreds of small breweries and has the largest number of breweries in the world. When visiting try some of the local specialties like Rauchbier (smoked beer) Dunkel (dark lager), wheat beer (Hefeweizen) and Helles pale lager. 

But bier isn’t the only viable drinking option, Franconian wines grown along the Main river produce some of the best whites in Germany. Franconian wines are bottled in easy-to-spot Bocksbeutel, green bulb shaped, bottles that you will want to take home as a souvenir of your visit. 

Rhineland 

The final region we are visiting is also the northernmost of the regions. Located in western Germany, this hilly Rhineland area surrounds the Rhine river and covers the areas of Germany that borders the countries of Luxembourg, Belgium and the Netherlands. Some of the most visited cities of the Rhineland; Bonn, Düsseldorf, Koblenz and Cologne are found throughout the middle section of the Rhine river.

Within this cooler area of Germany, the gastronomy is made up of hearty dishes of stews, potatoes, soups and traditional German offerings like sauerkraut. A popular dish of the region is Himmel un Ääd (Heaven and Earth), a mashed potato dish made with apples that signify heaven since they grow from trees and hang above the earth and potatoes which grow from the earth.

The perfect Rhine experience includes a visit to the largest city on the Rhine river, Cologne. A medieval city, Cologne is the largest city within western Germany and a prime cultural area. Featuring many architectural sites, landmarks and museums, the best gastronomy of the Rhineland region can be found in Cologne. The city boasts thousands of pubs, cafes and restaurants offering many opportunities to enjoy a Rhineland dining experience. 

A key part of a Cologne foodie experience is sampling the locally brewed Kölsch beer from one of the many local breweries here. Taking a local brewery tour, you will find paired with the local brewery cuisine; Kölsche Kaviar, a black pudding with onions or Halve Hahn, a traditional Cologne cheese sandwich made with locally sourced Gouda cheese on a rye roll with mustard and onions.  

When visiting Germany, food is just one of the many experiences that immerse you into the many faces of the Deutchland. If you need additional reasons why Germany needs to be on your travel bucket list, here are ten more for you. The best way to travel through Germany is by river cruise. Hit all of the best cities along the Rhine, the Main or the Moselle enjoying the towns, sites and the gastronomy of the different regions of Germany. 

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