Celebrate the New Year in Spain

The current climate of the world may keep us from being with that special someone for New Years, this year. The out with the old and in with the new which took us from 2020 into 2021 was a highly anticipated and desired change for most of the world. And although our new years eve may have looked very different this year, there is much to look forward to in the future. 

Many countries have traditions, rituals and superstitions that they practice to assure themselves healthy and prosperous years. Here in the United States it is customary to make resolutions and to share a kiss at midnight. Other countries may have a traditional item that they consume like in the Netherlands where they eat deep fried dough. Other countries have more unique traditions like in Brazil they throw white flowers into the ocean, Greece they hang onions on their doorways, New Years eve masses are held in cemeteries instead of churches in the country of  Chile and in Denmark they throw dishware at their friends and neighbors’ front doors. 

Spain though has many rituals that are practiced throughout the country and take New Years Eve very seriously just as they do their Christmas celebrations and post New Years. New Years in Spain is referred to as Noche Vieja, old night and reflects the culture of the Spanish people. 

Some of the fun New Years traditions you will find within Spain are;

Red Underwear

Yes you read that correctly, if you are looking for love in the upcoming new year, the Spanish ritual of wearing red underwear is a popular one. It has been said that the underwear must have been a gift and you are required to give them away at the end of the night, for Cupid to target you in the upcoming year. 

Celebrating in the Plaza Central

The locals head to the central square of their towns or villages that is centered around a a large clock on the post office tower. The main square in Spain is Puerta del Sol in Madrid which can be compared to New York’s Times Square where thousands gather to celebrate the arrival of a new year and their annual consumption of twelve grapes. Post midnight, the squares will be filled with Cava (sparkling) wine corks popping, confetti, noisemakers and streamers with revelers celebrating the new year. 

Doce Uvas (Eating 12 Grapes)

The most well known tradition requires that when the main clocks of Spain strike midnight, as each chime rings, celebrators swallow one grape before the next chime consuming a total of 12 grapes before the clock stops ringing. This tradition brings happiness, prosperity and good luck for each of the next twelve months of the year, with one grape bringing one month of luck in the upcoming year. The site of thousands of Spaniards stuffing grapes into their mouths and swallowing them whole is sure to be quite a site in itself and worth traveling to Spain to celebrate the Noche Vieja. But we are not done yet with the celebration. 

Cava 

The traditional Spanish sparkling wine is a popular tool for celebrating ringing in the new year, similarly to other parts of the world. What makes this tradition unique is that to bring fortune in the new year, it is custom to place gold items into the glass before midnight and the entire glass of cava must be consumed and the gold item retrieved. Many married couples will place their wedding rings in their glass as a symbol of fidelity and you can probably guess what is the most popular night for wedding proposals in Spain. 

Right Foot

It is believed that if you start off the New Year on the right foot, you will have a year of prosperity. That means literally using your right foot. It is conflicting based on who you ask, but some believe that you must step foot into your home after returning from your celebration while others have said that upon leaving your house on New Year’s day, your first step should be with your right foot. We guess either way, it is a step in the right direction. 

Foods:

Roscon de los Reyes (Twelfth Night Bread) is a popular New Year’s dessert. A circular cake, covered in candied fruit with a hidden gift placed into the cake. Similar to a Mardi Gras King Cake, the person who gets the surprise is crowned king or queen for the night. 

Churros are a customary treat to start the day on New Years enjoyed with hot chocolate. 

Lentil soup is a common Spanish tradition to eat on New Year’s day. The round shape of each lentil symbolizes a coin and enjoying a bowl of the coin soup will bring you wealth in the upcoming year. 

Puerta del Sol clock in Madrid

In Madrid, the evening usually starts with dinner amongst family and friends consisting of seafood or lamb before heading out to the Puerto del Sol or gathering together around their televisions to watch the clock strike midnight and enjoy their 12 grapes. Once the clock strikes midnight and the cheering and celebrating is over, the older members will head home while the all-nighters will head to a local club where the already active Madrid nightlife is ten fold a regular weekend and they dance into the wee hours of the morning when they can enjoy their hot chocolate and churros right out of the fryer. 

Magic Fountain in the Placa d’Espanya

In Barcelona, also family oriented, celebrations start with traditional dinners before heading out to the Gothic clubs or for a local countdown at the Magic Fountain in the Plaça d’Espanya at Montjuïc. All celebrations will feature the traditional grape eating with fireworks and Cava. Each of Barcelona’s ten districts set off twelve palm tree fireworks that coincide with the twelve chimes of the clock that precede a larger firework show from specific locations featuring larger more elaborate showings.  Post ringing in the New Year it is customary to continue to celebrate at local fiestas throughout the city with flamenco dancing, costumed guests and popular music, like the one hosted at the Spanish Village, Poble Espanyol.

The Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao

In Bilbao, the capital of the Basque region, the festivities start early on the 31st with a fun run like the Rekalde San Silvestre race which passes through the center of town or the popular New Years Eve day tradition to hike to the Gorbea Cross.  Parties begin in the afternoon in the Esplanade’s of some of the popular buildings within the Casco Viejo. For formal evenings, special dinner menus are offered featuring la cena cotillón de Noche Vieja specials at the Michlin and popular restaurants throughout the city. If looking for a less formal evening celebrating the night will occur at one of the many popular Pinxto bars throughout the city. The evening ends with a large firework display along the River Nervion over the contemporary landmarks of Bilbao . New Years day an annual music concert is held at the Palacio Euskalduna Hall and a popular attraction for the Basque locals.  

The Spanish culture year round is based on food, drink, music and festivity and the Noche Vieja is yet another reason for the Spaniards to celebrate. Regardless of where you are in Spain, the streets are decorated and lit and the Spanish locals will be joyful and ready to welcome you to celebrate their many traditions and the new year with them. 

Now is the best time to plan your holiday travel for 2021. Contact us to get more information about celebrating in Spain in 2021/2022. 

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